Lake View Cemetery, Cleveland, Ohio
This reverses yesterday’s postcard, looking up one of the slight rises at the family tombs.  In the distance rises the 70-foot-tall obelisk marking the grave of John D. Rockefeller Sr., who made his fortune with Standard Oil. In 1901, he was the richest man in the world.
On the left side of the card is the monument to Silas S. Stone, a real estate dealer who died in 1884. The likeness of him seated on his chair, clutching a roll of parchment, was apparently taken from life.
The back says, “Thanks for your pretty postcard. Hope you will like this.” It’s postmarked May 6, 1908.
It’s strange that it combines the blank space at the bottom on the front, like the old undivided back cards with the division on the back for writing your message.  Lake View Cemetery, Cleveland, Ohio
This reverses yesterday’s postcard, looking up one of the slight rises at the family tombs.  In the distance rises the 70-foot-tall obelisk marking the grave of John D. Rockefeller Sr., who made his fortune with Standard Oil. In 1901, he was the richest man in the world.
On the left side of the card is the monument to Silas S. Stone, a real estate dealer who died in 1884. The likeness of him seated on his chair, clutching a roll of parchment, was apparently taken from life.
The back says, “Thanks for your pretty postcard. Hope you will like this.” It’s postmarked May 6, 1908.
It’s strange that it combines the blank space at the bottom on the front, like the old undivided back cards with the division on the back for writing your message. 

Lake View Cemetery, Cleveland, Ohio

This reverses yesterday’s postcard, looking up one of the slight rises at the family tombs.  In the distance rises the 70-foot-tall obelisk marking the grave of John D. Rockefeller Sr., who made his fortune with Standard Oil. In 1901, he was the richest man in the world.

On the left side of the card is the monument to Silas S. Stone, a real estate dealer who died in 1884. The likeness of him seated on his chair, clutching a roll of parchment, was apparently taken from life.

The back says, “Thanks for your pretty postcard. Hope you will like this.” It’s postmarked May 6, 1908.

It’s strange that it combines the blank space at the bottom on the front, like the old undivided back cards with the division on the back for writing your message. 

  1. morbidloren posted this